Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Posts tagged “macro

bubble

A Calliphoridae fly also known as “Blow fly”, from an older English term for meat that had eggs laid on it, which was said to be fly blown. He was blowing a bubble of water, and then inhaled it again. There are many theories for this behaviour (to aid digestion, to cool the body, being sick, cleaningย  their mouthparts etc.) but no one knows for sure.


dance

A European honey bee (Apis mellifera), covered in pollen from a yellow rocketcress. Look what a happy little bee she is! With some imagination you can even see a smile on her face ๐Ÿ™‚

She posed nicely for some shots and then took off, probably in a hurry to tell her friends all about it. When bees have found good nectar or pollen, they fly home and share the news with the others. First, she lets the others taste the nectar or pollen, so they can determine which flower she’s found. Then she performs something called a “waggle dance” which is a particular figure-eight dance. It’s like drawing a map in the air; the dance gives directions (bees have inbuilt compasses and use the sun as a landmark), the speed of dancing indicates how far away the flower is – the faster she dances, the closer is the flower.

PS. Have ever wondered why some bees buzz louder than others? It kind of sounds like the bee is angry, but that’s not the case at all. They typically do this if the pollen is hard to reach, then the bee solves the problem by buzzing loudly, and thereby create a vibration to make the pollen fall down so the she can reach it. A clever solution!

 


unfurl

A closer look at an unfurling fiddlehead fern frond


syrphidae

A beautiful hoverfly (Eupeodes corollae) on a dandelion (Taraxacum) ๐Ÿ™‚

When I was a child, I thought these flies were unusually fast little bees or wasps but their coloring is a Batesian mimicry and they’re harmless. In fact, they do a lot of good as their larvae prey upon pest insects (which spread some diseases such as “curly top”) and adults feed on nectar and help to pollinate the flowers (which probably is why they’re sometimes called flower flies).


dinnertime

The yellow dung fly (Scathophaga stercoraria) spend their lives on dung, or looking for it. They are predators and the dung supplies their breeding and hunting ground. They hunt by ambushing insects visiting the dung. Here’s a male dung fly having dinner, its prey so big that I first thought I was interrupting an intimate moment with a lady dung fly ๐Ÿ˜‰


tattoo

This is not just a ladybug like all others.. She has a cat tattoo on her left shoulder! ๐Ÿ™‚

I always thought all ladybugs looked the same, but that’s not the case. According to Wikipedia, the spot size and coloration can provide some indication of how toxic the individual bug is to potential predators. It synthesizes the toxic alkaloids, N-oxide coccinelline and its free base precoccinelline; depending on sex and diet.

Seven-spotted ladybug or

Seven-spotted ladybug or “C-7” (Coccinella septempunctata)

Picture rotated and zoomed in:

tattoo-2

Hello Kitty


raynox

Some close up shots taken with a Raynox conversion lens attached to the SX60

raynox-1

A very cooperative Grasshopper

Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria)

Speckled Wood butterfly (Pararge aegeria)

Teeny tiny jumping spider

Teeny tiny jumping spider, so small I didn’t even see what it was with my naked eye