Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Latest

decay

Withered, but still decorative :)

decay-1

decay-2

Ps. I’m taking a little blog break, back in a few weeks!

w7

Only seven weeks into 2015, and this weekend I already found flowers to photograph. Crazy! This winter’s no winter.

w7-1

w7-2

w7-3

backlit

backlit

drum

A female Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major), drumming high up in the tree tops.. Zoomed in with my SX60

kyligt

So far we haven’t had a real winter here in Amsterdam this year either, but last night it snowed for the first time! Unfortunately it’s melted away already.. These pictures were taken this morning

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

entita

A little Marsh Tit (Poecile palustris), posing nicely on a sunny winter day

entita

växthus

Ice patterns on my mother’s greenhouse

vaxthus

2015

I hope you all have had a good start in 2015!

Just like in previous years, my first blog post of the year is a picture of my cousin A’s dog Stuffe. Eight years old and a bit grey around the nose but still playful as a puppy :)

2015

tree

Wishing you all HAPPY HOLIDAYS!! As usual this time of the year, I’m off to Sweden :) See you again in 2015!

tree

taltrast

This Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) rummaged through leaf-litter seeking potential food items. As you can see, the whole beak went into the mud in hopes of finding an earthworm, a snail or perhaps some nice berries.

About its scientific name: The generic name, Turdus, is the Latin for thrush, and the specific epithet refers to a character in Greek mythology, Philomela, who had her tongue cut out but was changed into a singing bird. Her name is derived from the Ancient Greek philo- (loving) and melos (song).

taltrast

PS. It can be a bit tricky to identify a Song Thrush since it looks quite similar to some other thrushes. If you see one, you can -besides checking your bird book- keep these general observations in mind: The spots on its breast look a bit like arrows pointing upwards. (Compare with e.g. Mistle Thrush which has more round spots and the Fieldfare which has arrow-shaped spots pointing downwards.) The back has a warm brown colour and part of the chest is warm beige. (The Mistle Thrush’s back has a more cold brown colour and the chest is lighter beige.) The face looks friendly and has warm colour tones. (The Mistle Thrush looks paler.)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,819 other followers

%d bloggers like this: