Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Raynox DCR-150

bubble

A Calliphoridae fly also known as “Blow fly”, from an older English term for meat that had eggs laid on it, which was said to be fly blown. He was blowing a bubble of water, and then inhaled it again. There are many theories for this behaviour (to aid digestion, to cool the body, being sick, cleaningΒ  their mouthparts etc.) but no one knows for sure.


unfurl

A closer look at an unfurling fiddlehead fern frond


syrphidae

A beautiful hoverfly (Eupeodes corollae) on a dandelion (Taraxacum) πŸ™‚

When I was a child, I thought these flies were unusually fast little bees or wasps but their coloring is a Batesian mimicry and they’re harmless. In fact, they do a lot of good as their larvae prey upon pest insects (which spread some diseases such as “curly top”) and adults feed on nectar and help to pollinate the flowers (which probably is why they’re sometimes called flower flies).


lady

This seven-spot ladybug (Coccinella septempunctata) has found the best spot in the park to enjoy the spring! Beautiful blossom and plenty to eat πŸ™‚

The name “ladybug” was coined by European farmers who prayed to the Virgin Mary when pests began eating their crops. After ladybugs came and wiped out the invading insects, the farmers named them “beetle of Our Lady”. This was later shortened to “lady beetle” and “ladybug”.


dinnertime

The yellow dung fly (Scathophaga stercoraria) spend their lives on dung, or looking for it. They are predators and the dung supplies their breeding and hunting ground. They hunt by ambushing insects visiting the dung. Here’s a male dung fly having dinner, its prey so big that I first thought I was interrupting an intimate moment with a lady dung fly πŸ˜‰


curls

Tiny patterns in nature, only a few centimeters tall. Nothing special, but nice to look at I think πŸ™‚


pollen

Yesterday I saw my first bee of the year, and not just any bee – I think she’s unusually beautiful, and look how happy she is! πŸ™‚ Covered in fresh pollen from a crocus, just what she needed after the winter.

European honey bee (Apis mellifera) on a Spring crocus (Crocus vernus)


tattoo

This is not just a ladybug like all others.. She has a cat tattoo on her left shoulder! πŸ™‚

I always thought all ladybugs looked the same, but that’s not the case. According to Wikipedia, the spot size and coloration can provide some indication of how toxic the individual bug is to potential predators. It synthesizes the toxic alkaloids, N-oxide coccinelline and its free base precoccinelline; depending on sex and diet.

Seven-spotted ladybug or

Seven-spotted ladybug or “C-7” (Coccinella septempunctata)

Picture rotated and zoomed in:

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Hello Kitty


w43

Some pictures I took in Sweden last weekend:

(1) A little Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) peeking out from behind a tree

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(2) Small mushrooms growing on a fallen tree trunk

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(3) Clematis seed heads up close

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(4) The autumn colours were wonderful. I was lucky; the day after I left it started to snow πŸ™‚

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w42

Week 42! Apologies for the slow update.. I haven’t used my regular cameras at all in the past months, but instead I’ve been shooting analogue with Diana Mini and an old Konica – first film rolls are developed and the results are Terrible but Fun πŸ™‚Β  Anyway, today I went to the forest and I brought my PS as well:

(1) Grey heron (Ardea cinerea)

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(2) Mushroom family

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(3) Sporophyte of the moss

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