Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Posts tagged “flowers

2018-45

It’s week 45, but I just took this “summer-looking” image! This picture was taken using a Helios-44 lens. Helios is probably the most famous vintage lens there is; it was produced in the old Soviet Union in 1958-1992 (my copy is from 1982) and is one of most mass produced lenses in the world. It comes in several variants. The version I have (“M”) is supposedly the worst one, but I’m very pleased with it. It’s built in solid metal, focuses down to 0.5 m, and has a mag ratio of 1:6:5 at the closest focus point. I bought it cheap (FYI – the average price in October 2018 was only $32) including an M42 adapter to fit in on my Fuji.

In case you’re interested, there’s a weekly podcast called “The Classic Lenses Podcast” and there’s an entire episode dedicated to the Helios-44 here


2018-42

All the leaves are brown… ♬♪♫ …Not! Because we have a sunny October that still feels a bit like summer!

On the other hand: Week 42 now = Only 10 weeks left this year!

Pictures taken with Fuji X-T2 camera and Pentax-A 50 mm lens.


2018-41

The maximum soap bubble bokeh I could get with the little Pentax-a lens 😉 Have a nice sunny Sunday everyone!


2018-38

Summer’s coming to an end… But there are still some brave flowers shining bright

Please follow me on Instagram, where I’m posting one picture every day — Fuji camera & various vintage lenses 🙂


2018-37

Three pictures from Sweden 🙂 Taken last weekend with my Fuji X-T2 camera and vintage lens Pentacon 50 mm.

I’ve also opened an Instagram account: @caleeamsterdam   ❤

 


2018-36

Week 36 – One more from the rose garden 🙂

(Posting a bit earlier than usual because I’m off to Sweden for the weekend!)

SOOC, no edit, no filter


2018-35

Playing with my Pentacon 50 mm lens in the Rosarium in Vondelpark.. It’s not to everyone’s taste, but I personally love bubbly bokeh 🙂

Besides adding a small signature, these images are SOOC without any editing/post processing. I appreciate CC, so if you have any ideas/suggestions please write something in the comment section below!


2018-34

New gear! 🙂 Test shots!

I got another vintage lens: Pentacon 135 2.8. It’s a telephoto lens made in GDR (East Germany), I found one in mint condition and got it super cheap.

There are two versions of this lens, and I got the second version which is inferior to the first as it only has 6 blades and the diaphragm can close to f/22 (the first version has 15 blades and can close to f/32), but still a very nice and sharp lens which is fun to use. The minimum focusing distance is 170 cm, something that will take a bit getting used to for me, especially since I’ve mainly shot with a 60 mm macro lens the past year. Anyway, today I went for a little walk and took some first test shots with my new (although it’s older than me) lens. It can of course only be used in full manual mode, but the focus ring is smooth and easy to use so it’s not really a problem I think.

Fast manual focus! 😉

Never seen so many wasps as I’ve done this summer! 😮


2018-23

Some random pictures I’ve taken with the Pentacon 50 mm lens… Have a nice week everyone!

Helophilus pendulus literally means “dangling march-lover”

The Donacia clavipes has amazing colors!

HUGE eyes…. and a goatee!


2018-19

A little Jet ant (Lasius fuliginosus) enjoying a beautiful day in the forest… Photos taken with Pentacon, this lens is about 45 years old (made in East Germany), and really nice to use. It’s not super sharp when shot open wide at f1.8, but that wasn’t the purpose of these shots anyway. 😉

“Sharpness really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be in my book. I’d rather look at an image with soft gloomy highlights with aberrations all over the place, than a clinically perfect super shot. It’s the same with human beings. It’s our flaws that make us unique. It’s these flaws that enhance beauty by giving us an immediate reference through presence of the less-than-perfect.”
Jonas Rask – official Fujifilm X-Photographer

The plant is known as cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), it’s a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant in the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae).


2018-18

Week 18! I’m very excited to share these images with you, they’re taken with a very old lens: Pentacon 50 mm f1.8. It’s got an M-42 mount so with an adapter I can use it on my Fuji camera. And I *love* this lens! Really, it has everything I’d ever wanted in a lens: It’s sharp where it’s supposed to be and soft where it’s supposed to be (with very nice, kind of dreamy bokeh).

Modern lenses are usually big and heavy because of their autofocus functions. Old lenses don’t have autofocus, thus a fraction of the size and weight even though they’re made of metal and not plastic. You can find this fantastic little lens at flea markets or charity shops for  20-25 Euro. I kid you not! If you see one, please do yourself a favor and buy it because that’s a purchase you’ll never regret.

If you’re worried about shooting in full manual mode, please don’t be. See it as an opportunity to become a better photographer! Nowadays, everyone’s snapping away with cameras that have several automatic settings and autofocus. Shooting in manual mode means you have to take the time to really think about what you want to photograph and how to do it; You have to set the focus, aperture, etc. manually and soon you’ll have a much better understanding of light and composition as well.

Pictures taken in Amsterdamse Bos today. I don’t want to post too many pictures at once, so I’ve selected only 3 examples of what this lens can do. No filters or photoshopping has been done, besides adding a small signature, these pictures are straight out of camera.

Red forest ant

Bubble bokeh

The Map (Araschnia levana) is a beautiful but skittish little butterfly. The most unusual fact about this butterfly is that its two annual broods look very different. The summer brood are black with white markings, looking like a miniature version of the White admiral and lacking most of the orange of the pictured spring brood.


2018-17

Week 17! Two green pictures: one bug and one flower.

First, a picture of a Green dock beetle (Gastrophysa viridula). They have a shiny, metallic sheen that’s primarily green but also gold, bronze and brass colors depending on their age and which light you see them in. If you see a metallic green little beetle and wonder how to identify which one it is, you can look at the legs – Green dock beetles have metallic green legs while most others have all black legs. This one was only 4 mm long so I think it’s a male (females are bigger).

(More info and pictures of a female dock beetle here)

Garlic mustard flower (Alliara petiolata) is a biennial plant, i.e. it’s a flowering plant that takes two years to complete its biological lifecycle. In its first year it forms clumps of round shaped, slightly wrinkled leaves, that when crushed smell like garlic. In the next year it produces these beautiful cross shaped white flowers in the spring.


2018-13

Happy Easter everyone!

My beloved Fuji X-T1 can only do double exposures, not multiple as some other cameras can (up to 10, I think?). My workaround was to take several double exposures and then merge them in a software. It was the first time I’ve tried it, but certainly not the last. So much fun to discover and play around with new techniques 🙂 If anyone has any advice on how to take/make ME’s, please share!

(i) Multiple exposure

(ii) Double exposure (in camera)


2018-11

Slowly.. small flowers start to pop up here and there! Some people regard the daisy (Bellis perennis) and coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) as weed, but they are beautiful and both these are used in traditional herbal medicine so they’re useful as well 🙂


2018-10

One of the roses in Vondelpark’s Rosarium has survived the winter and is still looking quite nice 🙂


2018-8

Week 8 in 2018-

More snowdrops… Next week I’ll definitely try to find something else to photograph! 😉


2018-7

Not much to photograph during today’s walk, besides some more flowers! As you can see, it was a lovely sunny Sunday here in Amsterdam today 🙂

Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis)

 

Winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis)

 

Crocus (Crocus sativus)


2018-6

The Winter Olympics are on! But here in Amsterdam I’ve already found the first signs of “spring” 🙂

Crocus (Crocus sativus)

Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis)


w52

Happy New Year!

I’m a day late for week 52’s post, but here it is anyway – New shots taken with Fuji 60 mm a few days ago:

Last week of December, I can’t believe these have managed to survive this long!

A cat in the neighborhood. No problem for this lens to focus through the branches!


w44

A Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica) sitting on a waste basket. Isn’t he beautiful! Look at those coloured feathers and intelligent eyes.

Magpies are often maligned as pests, but they’re actually very interesting birds that are usually overlooked for both their beauty and their intelligence. They are closely related to crows, jays, and ravens; thus among the most intelligent family of birds (Corvidae). And after studying them, I’m convinced that magpies have a great sense of humour too! 🙂

Because magpies are often misunderstood, here are 3 interesting facts about them:

(i) Magpies don’t steal shiny objects. This has been established in several experiments, for example research published by Science Focus and the BBC.

(ii) Magpies recognize themselves in mirrors. European magpies have demonstrated the remarkable ability to recognize their own reflections in mirrors, something that was once thought to be a defining characteristic belonging only to humans. This might not sound that amazing, but out of countless species tested, only four ape species, bottlenose dolphins and Asian elephants have demonstrated this ability.

(iii) A group of magpies is called “a parliament”. They earned this title from often appearing in large groups, looking stately and cawing at each other.

And a little flower…


w42

Week 42! Autumn is definitely here… 5 pics:

(i) Composition by mother nature

(ii) Soaking up as much light as possible

(iii) Last bee of this year?

(iv) Unedited flower shot

(v) Same shot – Heavily edited version; fun, but not my style


w40

Week 40 – Autumn is here but we still have some flowers 🙂


syrphidae

A beautiful hoverfly (Eupeodes corollae) on a dandelion (Taraxacum) 🙂

When I was a child, I thought these flies were unusually fast little bees or wasps but their coloring is a Batesian mimicry and they’re harmless. In fact, they do a lot of good as their larvae prey upon pest insects (which spread some diseases such as “curly top”) and adults feed on nectar and help to pollinate the flowers (which probably is why they’re sometimes called flower flies).


tortoiseshell

Two pictures of a small tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae), a colourful Eurasian butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. I took these pictures today on the “PEN island” outside Amsterdam.