Smile! The world is a beautiful place (^_^)

Pentacon 50mm f1.8

2018-52

Week 52 – The last blog post of the year, and also the last one before taking a break from blogging.

My last picture is one I took this week with my favorite camera Fujifilm X-T2 and vintage lens Pentacon 50 mm f1.8

I’ll continue to post pictures on Instagram (link on top) – Hope to see you there! 🙂

And last but not least: Happy New Year!

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2018-39

Mushroom season is here! Here are some pictures taken with my Fuji X-T2 camera and vintage lens Pentacon 50 mm 🙂

This swirley bokeh is one of the reasons why I love this little lens


2018-38

Summer’s coming to an end… But there are still some brave flowers shining bright

Please follow me on Instagram, where I’m posting one picture every day — Fuji camera & various vintage lenses 🙂


2018-37

Three pictures from Sweden 🙂 Taken last weekend with my Fuji X-T2 camera and vintage lens Pentacon 50 mm.

I’ve also opened an Instagram account: @caleeamsterdam   ❤

 


2018-36

Week 36 – One more from the rose garden 🙂

(Posting a bit earlier than usual because I’m off to Sweden for the weekend!)

SOOC, no edit, no filter


2018-35

Playing with my Pentacon 50 mm lens in the Rosarium in Vondelpark.. It’s not to everyone’s taste, but I personally love bubbly bokeh 🙂

Besides adding a small signature, these images are SOOC without any editing/post processing. I appreciate CC, so if you have any ideas/suggestions please write something in the comment section below!


2018-23

Some random pictures I’ve taken with the Pentacon 50 mm lens… Have a nice week everyone!

Helophilus pendulus literally means “dangling march-lover”

The Donacia clavipes has amazing colors!

HUGE eyes…. and a goatee!


2018-21

The cardinal beetle is actually three different species of beetles.  The most common one is the Red-headed cardinal (Pyrochroa serraticornis), which is an orange-red beetle with a – duh – read head. It’s about 2 cm long and easy to spot as it kind of glows (in the closeup shot below you can see the color is kind of red metallic). The Black-headed cardinal (Pyrochroa coccinea) has a – uhm – black head and is rarer, slightly larger and its body has a deeper blood-red color. The third kind is the Scarce cardinal (Schizotus pectinicornis), it also has a black head but is less than 1 cm long.

Cardinal beetles prey on other insects, while their bright red color prevents them from being targeted by other predators because red usually means toxic in the bug world.

If you see a beetle with red wings and black underside and wonder if it’s a cardinal beetle or not, the easiest tell is to look at the antennae: Cardinals have toothed antennae. It’s often confused with the Scarlet lily beetle, which is smaller and usually found eating lily leaves.

Black-headed cardinal (Pyrochroa coccinea)

Red-headed cardinal (Pyrochroa serraticornis)

Orange-red metallic

Those toothed antennae

A failed attempt of photographing a flying cardinal beetle, but ended up with an interesting bokeh shot instead


2018-20

Two different takes on two different kinds of butterflies-

(1) Speckled Wood (Pararge aegeria), photographed today with Fuji 18-135 mm + Raynox 150. Goal was to get close to the butterfly and capture as much detail as possible. Picture not edited except it’s been slightly cropped.

(2) Green-veined white (Pieris napi), photographed with Pentacon 50 mm. Goal was to capture the moody light in the forest, not so much details in the butterfly (although enough to determine that it’s a female spring brood). Picture not edited or cropped.

Would you do me a favor and let me know which one you prefer? Not saying one is “better” than the other, but just curious to know your preference. You can use the voting buttons below! Thanks 🙂


2018-19

A little Jet ant (Lasius fuliginosus) enjoying a beautiful day in the forest… Photos taken with Pentacon, this lens is about 45 years old (made in East Germany), and really nice to use. It’s not super sharp when shot open wide at f1.8, but that wasn’t the purpose of these shots anyway. 😉

“Sharpness really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be in my book. I’d rather look at an image with soft gloomy highlights with aberrations all over the place, than a clinically perfect super shot. It’s the same with human beings. It’s our flaws that make us unique. It’s these flaws that enhance beauty by giving us an immediate reference through presence of the less-than-perfect.”
Jonas Rask – official Fujifilm X-Photographer

The plant is known as cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris), it’s a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant in the family Apiaceae (Umbelliferae).